Daniel W. Robert

Front-End Engineer. Always a student.


  • UNIX-like operating systems (e.g., Linux, MacOS) have a handful of commands for managing your running programs (jobs) in the Terminal. From your Terminal application, you have the ability to manually send jobs to run in the background, bring them to the foreground, or suspend them. Below are the main job control commands with examples. List […]

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  • Every time I’ve installed a new installation of WordPress, I would install the latest version. Naturally. And 99% of the time, why wouldn’t you? Today, however, I explicitly needed to test a release against an older version of WordPress Core. In doing so, I learned a couple of useful things. 1. WP CLI Version Flag […]

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  • As of ES6, we are able to set default parameter values when defining a function, as shown below: This allows for named parameters to be initialized with default values if no value is present or it evaluates to undefined. If you want to call a function without passing one of the parameters, allowing it to fall […]

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  • Node.js is a perfect runtime to create a CLI script that can run on any machine that has Node installed. A CLI program in Node is really just an ordinary Node.js app. In order to make the program available to be executed by your machine, we need to do a couple of small setup steps. […]

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  • Typically, when I need to debug something with dev tools on a mobile layout, Chrome’s device toolbar is sufficient enough. Occasionally, it’s necessary to debug right on the device, since certain things differ between Safari and Chrome’s emulation. The downside is that, at the time of writing this, you can’t use dev tools on your […]

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  • When debugging in JavaScript, browser extenstions can be a potential source of confusion. At the very least, they may add additional noise to the process. In order to make sure you’re not dealing with any extra code outside of your application, you can use Incognito Mode to browse in private. This disables all of your extensions […]

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  • OOP in JS: Object Basics

    Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) is a popular programming paradigm that allows us a way to structure and maintain complex code. Unlike other programming languages that use class-based object orientation, JavaScript uses prototype-based object orientation. This difference may be a source of confustion for developers coming from a class-based language, especially when using the “syntactical sugar” of […]

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  • In order for JavaScript to operate in the way that it does, it relies on three core components: I am not covering the concept of asynchronicity here but I will go over that in a future note(s). Memory & The Thread of Execution When a JavaScript program runs it goes through the code, line-by-line, and […]

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  • TIL: GitHub Emojis

    I knew GitHub supported emojis – I often use them in PR messages, comments, etc. What I didn’t know is that you can also add emojis in your commit messages. For example, if you wanted to include an Octocat emoji, you can write your commit message as follows: If you’ve spent any time working in […]

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  • Up until now, we only had two ways to write a string in JavaScript – single and double quotes. If we wanted to interpolate a variable with one of these string options, we’d need to break out of the string and concatenate the variable. As of ES2015, we are able to use Template Literals (AKA […]

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